Featured Product: Chosen by Mallory Cash

Mallory Cash joined Dalton Carpet One in 2015. Specializing in tile merchandising and interior design, she is very familiar with the exclusive tile products available at Dalton Carpet One.

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Her Featured Product pick is BlendArt, a beautiful balance of the character of real wood and the durability and low maintenance of tile. The worn yet charming look of vintage reclaimed wood is realistically reproduced in this collection. Bring out the look of rectified wood to any project, indoors or outdoors, while appreciating the incomparable durability of porcelain tile.

“The chic look of Blendart wood grain tile creates a luxurious, yet rough aesthetic to any space,” says Mallory. “This flooring is the perfect blend of rustic, chic, and indulgence. It combines the timeworn appearance of painted wood planks with the lavishness of porcelain stoneware.”

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PRODUCT DETAILS

  • Product Name: BlendArt
  • Color Name: Natural White
  • Finish: Natural
  • Style: Farmhouse/Rustic Luxury
  • Sizes: 6” x 48” | 12” x 48” | 16” x 48” | 24” x 24” | 36” x 36” |
  • Material: Porcelain Tile
  • Color Variation: Moderate Variation
  • Price: $7 – $12/sq ft

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Mallory was brought aboard as a part-time assistant to both the Merchandising and Interior Design departments. Soon afterward, she joined Dalton Carpet One as a full-time member of the Merchandising team. Since then, she has become a part of the Kitchen and Bath Interior Design team, specializing in tile and cabinets.

Mallory graduated from Athens Technical College with an Interior Design degree in 2011, and earned a Marketing Specialist Certificate in 2015. She traveled abroad to several cities in Italy in 2009 to study history, architecture, and to brush up on her sketching skills.

Mallory’s many areas of expertise include space planning, FF&E (Furniture, Fixtures, and Equipment), interior design, and project coordination.

She lives in Commerce with her husband Drake and their son, Landon.

Office: 706.353.0547
Email: mcash@daltoncarpetone.com
www.daltoncarpetone.com

For more information on the products shown here or any other flooring or cabinet products available at Dalton Carpet One, visit our showroom on Atlanta Highway in Athens or call 706.353.0547.

 

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Renovating Budget Tips

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Nearly a third of homeowners do not have an initial budget prior to starting their home renovations (31%) [Houzz]. Having a budget in mind is extremely beneficial to the designer, as it serves as a guide for what direction to go in and it focus on what is really important to you. Creating a budget also helps you know what your means are, making over-spending less likely to happen.

With a wide variety of quality products available, there’s a kitchen for just about every budget, ranging from the lovely to the super deluxe. Most homeowners have an idea of how much they want to spend; however, deciding how to allocate those dollars can be confusing with all of the options available today.

To share a few examples, a large show-stopper of a kitchen with luxurious materials in a metro area could start at more than $100,000 and even go beyond that. However, a lovely, modest makeover in a smaller town can be achieved around $20,000 ­to $25,000.

Here are a few tips that can help keep you within budget:

  • Keep your priorities front and center. A $100 simple stainless steel sink or a farmhouse-style one in antique copper for $3,500? A $4 polished brass knob or a $98 crystal model? Figure out what is important to you!
  • Plan your budget for a 10% overage in case there are unexpected expenses that occur
  • To scale back financially, ask yourself if all chosen features are necessary; however, bear in mind that what you might not miss now could be an essential feature months, or even years, down the road. Avoid future disappointment by including as much functionality as possible early in the design process. This is especially true of bathroom storage solutions that need to be put in place when the cabinetry is being installed.

How much do I spend?

A recent national survey conducted by National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) offers as a guideline for allocating your construction budget. They found that, on average, consumers working with a designer spent the following:

4%…………………………………………………………………………………………Design Fees
17%…………………………………………………………………………………………Installation
14%……………………………………………………………………..Appliances and Ventilation
29%…………………………………………………………………………Cabinetry and Hardware
10%………………………………………………………………………………………..Countertops
5%……………………………………………………………………………………………….Lighting
7%……………………………………………………………………………………………….Flooring
4%………………………………………………………………………………..Doors and Windows
5%…………………………………………………………………………………..Walls and Ceilings
4%……………………………………………………………………………..Faucets and Plumbing
1%…………………………………………………………………………………………………..Other

Let our full service design team at Dalton Carpet One help you put together a budget for your renovating project.

For more information on Dalton Carpet One, stop by the showroom at 3690 Atlanta Highway, Suite 108 in Athens, Ga., call 706.353.0547 or visit www.daltoncarpetone.com.

Flooring Terminology

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Flooring words you should know

There are hundreds of different products to choose from which can make picking a new floor a daunting task. You want to make sure you are getting the best quality product for your budget. We wanted to help by providing a glossary of fairly common flooring terms so you can understand better as you shop. Don’t be afraid to ask questions! The more you know, the easier it will be to make the choice that’s best for your home.

Above Grade: Any surface that is above the level of the surrounding ground.

Acrylic Impregnated: Acrylic monomers are injected into the cell structure of the wood to increase hardness, then finished with a wear layer over the wood.

Acrylic Urethane: Slightly different chemical composition than Polyurethane, with similar benefits.

Aluminum Oxide: Added to the wear layer of a urethane finish for increased abrasion resistance. Popular on better grade wood floors.

Below Grade: Any surface that is below the level of the surrounding ground.

Better: A quality of oak that has small knots and light dark graining.

Beveled Edge: Hardwood boards with a distinctive groove in them, as seen in informal and country decor. With today’s urethane finishes, these edges can be completely sealed, making these floors easy to clean.

Buckle: When humidity is high, wood expands and gaps disappear. In situations of too much moisture, wood may cup, or “buckle.”

Clear: A quality of oak that has no visual blemishes or knots. Expensive.

Cross-ply Construction: A technique where wood plies are stacked on top of each other in opposing directions. The result is a wood floor that is dimensionally stable and less affected by moisture. Allows the plies to counteract each other, thus prohibiting the plank from shrinking or expanding under humid conditions. These floors can be installed over concrete and/or below grade.

Cupping: Warping with a concave condition; the center is lower than the sides.

Eased Edge: Some manufacturers add this slightly beveled edge to both the length and end joints of their hardwood planks. This helps hide minor irregularities, including uneven plank heights. Also called “micro-beveled edge.”

Engineered: One of the three common types of hardwood floor (the others are Solid and Longstrip Plank). Generally made with 2,3, or 5 thin sheets or plies of wood, laminated together to form a single plank. Most can be nailed, stapled or glued down, or floated over a variety of subfloors, including some existing flooring.

Finish in Place: The term given to unfinished hardwood floors that are installed onsite, sanded and finished with an application of 2 to 3 coats of urethane that is brushed or mopped on. May be screened and recoated to rejuvenate the finish and revitalize the floor’s natural beauty.

Floating Floor Installation: With this method of installation, hardwood floors are not mechanically fastened to any part of the subfloor. Instead, a thin pad is placed between the wood and the subfloor and wood glue is applied in the tongue and groove of each plank. This technique protects against moisture, reduces noise, feels softer and provides for some additional “R” value. Some Engineered floors and all Longstrip floors can be floated.

Glue Down: The process in which hardwood floor is adhered to a subfloor using a recommended mastic or adhesive, spread on with the proper sized trowel. Engineered wood floors and parquets are typically glued down, while solid strip and plank floors are nailed or stapled.

Graining: Each species of wood has its own unique texture, color and graining, determined by the way it was cut.

Janka Hardness Test: The standard test for determining a wood’s hardness rating in which the force required to embed a .444 inch steel ball to half its diameter in a piece of wood is measured. The higher the number, the harder the wood. Only used as a general guideline.

Knot: The round, harder, typically darker cross-section of a piece of wood where a branch once joined the tree trunk

Laminate: A manufactured product sandwiching a backing material, visual element and a wear layer that simulates the look of hardwood, stone, or other natural or unnatural surfaces.

Longstrip Plank: One of the three common types of hardwood floor (the others are Solid and Engineered). Similar to Engineered floors in that multiple layers or plies are glued together on top of a center core that is typically a softer wood material that is also used to make the tongue and groove. The result is a board that appears to be 3 rows wide and several planks long. Comes in a wide variety of domestic and exotic hardwood species. Easy to replace if damaged.

Moisture Cured Urethane: A chemical similar to solvent-based urethanes, but requires humidity (moisture) to cure.  Extremely difficult to apply, has a strong odor and is best left to the professional.

Moldings: Used to cover expansion joints and to enhance the performance and appearance of a hardwood floor. Typically need to be removed for installation.

Nail Down: Nailing cleats are used with a wood flooring nailer and a mallet to attach hardwood flooring to a subfloor. This method of installation is typically used with the 3/4″ solid products, though adapters exist for thinner floors.

Number 1 Common: A quality of oak that has some knots and some dark graining.

Number 2 Common: A quality of oak that has even more knots and dark graining.

On-Grade: At ground level

Polyurethane: A clear, durable finish applied as a wear layer over hardwood floor.

Pre-Finished Wood: Hardwood flooring that comes sanded, stained and finished at the manufacturing plant, ready for installation in your home. These products typically provide a harder, better-protected surface because several coats of urethane are applied and UV dried. Offers a wider variety of wood species and saves hours of labor and cleanup. May be screened and recoated to rejuvenate the finish and revitalize the floor’s natural beauty.

Rotary Cut: A hardwood cutting process that displays a larger and bolder graining pattern.

Select: A quality of oak that has some small knots but very little dark graining.

Sliced Cut: A hardwood cutting process that shows a more uniform pattern.

Solid: One of the three common types of hardwood floor (the others are Engineered and Longstrip Plank). One solid piece of wood that has tongue and groove sides. Comes unfinished or pre-finished. Sensitive to moisture.

Solvent-Based Urethane Oil: Used as part of the chemical composition of a polyurethane finish

Square Edge: When the edges of all hardwood boards meet squarely to create a uniform, smooth surface that blends the floor together from strip to strip or plank to plank.

Stapled Down: A method of hardwood installation in which staples are used to attach the wood to the subfloor. A pneumatic gun is often used.

Strip: The “classic” hardwood floor with narrower board widths. Most common species are red oak, white oak, maple, cherry, white ash, hickory and pecan.

Tongue and Groove: The joining of two hardwood boards, one having a tongue on its edge that fits into the groove in the edge of the other.

Trim: See “Moldings”

Un-Finished Wood Floor: Not pre-finished in a factory. Allows you to customize your floor by sanding, staining/finishing it on site. Also see  “Finish in Place.”

UV Cured: Hardwood finishes cured in a factory with Ultra Violet lights versus heat.

Vinyl Composition Tile: These floor tiles are made from vinyl resins and filler materials to create resilient flooring in assorted colors and patterns.

Water-Based Urethane: A polyurethane finish that includes water in its chemical composition, dries clear and is non-yellowing.

Wilton Carpet: Woven carpet made in a variety of patterns and textures but with a limited number of colors per pattern.

Wood Flooring: Most wood flooring is made of hardwoods, such as oak, maple, pecan, beech and birch. There is solid wood flooring and laminated, which combines wood layered in different directions for strength and to inhibit warping. Most wood flooring today is prefinished at the factory to ease of installation and uniformity of finish.

Woven Carpet: Looms interlace warp (lengthwise) and filling (widthwise) yarns to create a sturdy textile for the floor. Much woven carpet is produced in intricate, colorful patterns. Types of woven carpet include Axminster and Wilton.

For more information on Dalton Carpet One, stop by the showroom at 3690 Atlanta Highway, Suite 108 in Athens, Ga., call 706.353.0547 or visit www.daltoncarpetone.com.

Area Rug Guidelines

Looking for a great way to change the look of your room with little effort? An area rug is a striking design element to update any space. It pulls together the space, adds interest to the floor and can even influence the color palette for the whole room. But, that’s a lot of pressure to put on one item in your room. Choosing the perfect rug can be very difficult.

There are rules, and there are many who disagree with these rules. Instead of adding rules to the list, here are three guidelines to help you choose the rug that is right for your room.

Get the right fit
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Before you go shopping for your rug, measure the room the rug will be in and map out where your furniture will be placed. Most rugs come in standard sizes (8×10, 9×12, 4×6, etc.). One of these sizes should work for your space, but sometimes that is not the case. Fortunately there are options to get that perfect fit. You can always choose a broadloom, or wall-to-wall, carpet, have it cut to the size you need, and have the edges bound is a great alternative to purchasing a standard size rug. This way it is custom-fitted to the space. Just be sure to keep the rug at least 8 – 10 inches away from the wall to show off some of the floor around the rug.

Hall rugs should have at least six inches of floor showing on all sides. In bedrooms, try runners at each side and even the foot of the bed, or place a rug one-third of the way under the bed so the rest of the rug creates a nice mat at the bottom of the bed. Even a beautiful rug can look odd in a room it doesn’t quite fit into, so follow these tips to be sure the rug looks like it is supposed to be there.

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You can find all sorts of rules about area rugs online, so how do you know which ones to follow and which ones to ignore? It truly is a matter of your personal taste, as long as you define the area without confining it.

With all the rules out there, there are a few that almost everyone will agree on. If you’re looking for a rug for your dining room, it is very important that you choose on that is large enough that all four legs of your chairs will remain on the rug even when they are pulled out. The rug should be centered under the table and extend at least 18 inches beyond the edge of the table so that the rug accommodates the dining chairs without worry about chair legs getting caught on the edge of the rug. Choosing a rug that fits the shape of the table is a good way to help soften the space.

As mentioned above, one rule to abide by is to keep some space in between the rug and the wall to show the floor. You don’t want it to look like you have wall-to-wall carpet. A good guide is to choose a rug that is two feet shorter than the smallest wall in the room. You should swing open the front door and then measure the floor from that point, so the first three feet or so remain clear.

In large rooms, rugs should fit the configuration of the room and furniture. A big room set up with two smaller conversation areas would look best with two separate rugs, as long as they’re linked by color or texture. In the end it is your space, so do whatever feels right to you!

Be Consistent
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Some say all the legs of your furniture should be on the rug, others say all of them should be off, and many say half on half off. There are situations where all these rules work and some of it is just a matter of taste. We say that you should just pick one technique and be consistent. Take a gander at inspiration sites like Houzz and Pinterest to get a good idea of the look you want to accomplish. You’ll be able to tell which “rule” you prefer right away.

The best thing about area rugs is that they are easy to change so you can try something new without a long-term commitment. We have a variety of area rugs in our showroom, as well as binding capabilities to make any fragment of carpet into a rug for your space. We can help you personalize your space to meet your vision.

Dalton Carpet One has more than 200 area rugs in a range of traditional and trendy styles. Whether you’re drawn to wool or sisal fibers, indoor or outdoor options, or not quite sure, let our designers help you select the perfect rug to freshen up your room.

For more information on Dalton Carpet One, stop by the showroom at 3690 Atlanta Highway, Suite 108 in Athens, Ga., call 706.353.0547 or visit www.daltoncarpetone.com.